English

Language and Literature
Key Stage 3Key Stage 4

Key Stage 3

Reading is fundamental. We instil in our pupils a love of reading because, for a while, they can imagine living in a different body, in a different place, with different people, which is what we wish for.

In response to reading our pupils will explore aspects of writing both fiction and non-fiction.

Both reading and writing will enhance our pupils’ use of standard English, encouraging them to be fluent and confident readers, writers and speakers.

Year 7

The year begins with poetry, focusing on language used for effect, terminology and structure.
In the second half of the Autumn greater emphasis is made on the outside world and social media in its many forms.

After Christmas pupils are introduced to Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream or The Tempest.

In early Spring pupils begin reading a range of non-fiction material, focusing attention on different reading styles and genres, openings, endings and character development.
Pupils are encouraged to develop extended writing through a variety of reading material, pre and post 20th century. This helps them to work on writing for effect, using linguistic devices and structural features.

Throughout the year every class reads several fictional books and produces reviews.

Alongside developing reading and writing skills, every pupil becomes familiar with examination formats, time management and the importance of revision skills. This is undertaken through the study of AQA practice examination papers, which mirror those taken in Year 11 for GCSE English Language.

Year 8

The year begins with poetry, focusing on language used for effect, terminology and structure.

In the second half of the Autumn greater emphasis is made on the outside world and social media in its many forms.

After Christmas pupils are introduced to Shakespeare: The Tempest or The Merchant of Venice.

In early Spring pupils begin reading a range of non-fiction material, focusing attention on different reading styles and genres, openings, endings and character development.

Pupils are encouraged to develop extended writing through a variety of reading material, pre and post 20th century. This helps them to work on writing for effect, using linguistic devices and structural features.

Throughout the year every class reads several fictional books and produces reviews.

Alongside developing reading and writing skills, every pupil becomes familiar with examination formats, time management and the importance of revision skills. This is undertaken through the study of AQA practice examination papers which mirror those taken in Year 11 for GCSE English Language.

Year 9

The year begins with poetry, focusing on language used for effect, terminology and structure.

In the second half of the Autumn greater emphasis is made on the outside world and social media in its many forms.

After Christmas pupils are introduced to Shakespeare: Macbeth.

In early Spring, pupils begin reading a range of non-fiction material, focusing attention on different reading styles and genres, openings, endings and character development.

Pupils are encouraged to develop extended writing through a variety of reading material, pre and post 20th century. This helps them to work on writing for effect, using linguistic devices and structural features.

Throughout the year every class reads several fictional books and produces reviews.

Alongside developing reading and writing skills, every pupil becomes familiar with examination formats, time management and the importance of revision skills. This is undertaken through the study of AQA practice examination papers which mirror those taken in Year 11 for GCSE English Language.

Further to this, we introduce pupils to GCSE set texts – Frankenstein and poetry from the AQA Anthology (Power and Conflict Cluster)

Assessments

All pupils are assessed and monitored half termly through a levelled piece of work – reading and writing. Also, examination papers are used to assess them in a more formal setting.

Key Stage 4

As English is a core subject, all pupils are required to study it. The skills developed through the GCSE English Language/Literature course, support all other curriculum areas.

GCSE English Language/Literature

English Language:

Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing
Section A: Reading: One literature fiction text
Section B: Writing: Descriptive or narrative writing
Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes – 80 marks 50% GCSE Assessed

Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives
Section A: Reading: One non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction text
Section B: Writing: Writing to present a viewpoint
Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes – 80 marks 50% GCSE Assessed
Non-examination: Assessment: Spoken Language

English Literature:

Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel
Section A: Shakespeare (Currently Romeo and Juliet)
Section B: 19th Century Novel (Currently Frankenstein)
Written Examination: 1 hour 45 minutes – 64 marks 40% GCSE Assessed

Paper 2: Modern Texts and Poetry
Section A: Modern Texts (Currently An Inspector Calls)
Section B: Poetry (Currently Power and Conflict Cluster)
Section C: Unseen Poetry
Written Examination: 2 hours 15 minutes – 96 marks 60% GCSE Assessed

Homework and School-based Assessments

Pupils are assessed through continuous study: classwork and homework. There are also end of year examinations and mock examinations to highlight individual strengths, weaknesses and areas for improvement.

The awarding body is AQA: English Language Syllabus 8700 and English Literature Syllabus 8702

Further Study

English Language, Literature and Media Studies are popular choices at A Level. As English is a core subject, the skills developed during the GCSE course also support Humanities and Science routes into Further Education.

Department Staff

Mrs C Greenhalgh

Head of English

Mrs E Healey

Teacher of English

Contact English